exhibition


Liam Young, 26 03 17


The Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery presents Liam Young: New Romance, the first U.S. solo exhibition of speculative architect, artist, and filmmaker Liam Young. The exhibition features three recently completed film projects – In the Robot Skies (2016), Where the City Can’t See (2016), and the debut of Renderlands (2017) – as well as a selection of props, materials and research that helped shape the fictional worlds encompassed in each film.

While storytelling, documentary film and multimedia performance have been central to Young’s practice, the exhibition reveals his emerging engagement with narrative film as an architectural medium and his ground-breaking experimentation with new technologies as cinematic tools. Young deploys autonomous drones (In the Robot Skies), manipulates laser scanning and data (Where the City Can’t See), and mines the digital detritus of the global industry of outsourced renderings (Renderlands) to create new worlds where fictions unfold. Harnessing technologies of visualization and narrative to craft urban imaginaries, the trio of films expand our understanding of how architectural design can uncover possible futures.

 

exhibition


Liam Young, 15 10 15


As a part of the Human+, The Future of Our Species exhibition at the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona Liam Young has developed another panorama and set of models for the ongoing project New City. You can see the new project at Human+ from 7 October 2015 – 10 April 2016 . New City is an ongoing series of animated skylines of the near future. In intricate detail they depict a speculative urbanism or exaggerated present, that is a projection of the environmental, political and cultural consequences of new technologies. Photographs taken on expeditions around the world documenting these emerging phenomena have been meticulously stitched together and reimagined to form each future city skyline. In this way ‘New City’ slips between the documentary and the visionary, where current trends are satirized and extrapolated to provoke a discussion about the impact technology has on our world. Machines of Post Human Production is the latest panorama from New City and depicts scenes from along the planetary scaled conveyor belt and endless factory floor of technology manufacture. Along this global infrastructure the body has been repurposed as a machine, just one more component of a production line which connects the cities of consumption to the online shopping distribution centre, the autonomous container ships of maritime trade, the rows of choreographed factory robots and the super scaled mining equipment that roam the earth. Driven by efficiency algorithms, watching over us through programmed machine vision these are the creatures of the post Anthropocene, the mechanisms that now produce our world.

exhibition


Liam Young, 19 10 14


Opening on October 4th at Z33 in Belgium, Future Fictions. Perspectives on worldbuilding explores how contemporary artists, designers and architects relate to future thinking and imaging: from map-ping, questioning and criticizing, to developing complex visions about the structures and systems that may shape our life in the future. Tomorrows Thoughts Today’s Liam Young will première a 3 screen projection work ‘New City’, a series of near future city skylines. New City is a collaboration with the authors Jeff NoonPat Cadigan and Tim Maughan and musicians Coldcut.

With these visions/fictions, Z33 wishes to shift the debate away from what is possible, plausible and probable towards what is preferable: Future Fictions there-fore is essentially a project about ideas and ideals, about dreams beyond hope and fear. Can we learn to critically assess the future visions presented? Which criteria would be valid in doing so?  In other words, can we learn to become ‘future literate’? Other artists include Dunne & RabyAtelier Van Lieshout, Near Future Laboratory and many more. Curated by Karen Verschooren. Photo credit Kristof Vrancken/Z33

exhibition


Liam Young, 03 02 13


Tomorrows Thoughts Today’s Liam Young is one of the curators of the 2013 Lisbon Architecture Triennale. Liam is developing the exhibition Future Perfect , a fictional future city that will open for visitors in September 2013. Future Perfect zooms into the fictional city developed for Under Tomorrow’s Sky and develops fragments of the future city at a 1:1 scale.

In a time of crisis architects need to be exploring big visions and bold gestures. It is not the time to retreat. The future must become a project again. Future Perfect brings together an ensemble of scientists, technologists, futurists, science fiction authors and designers to collectively develop the props, spaces, machines, cultures and narratives of their own brave new future city – an imaginary urbanism, the landscapes that surround it and the stories it contains.

Emerging in the shadows of the decaying towers of a post oil Dubai, Future Perfect is imagined as a new terraformed urban island. It is a city that is grown rather than built, a computed territory, faceted and abstracted, endlessly reprinting itself as demand requires. Buildings tessellate down the landscape as an inhabited geology of crevice rooms, and public valleys. Its material fabric has evolved as a complex endemic ecology where nature and technology intertwine and where biology becomes an economy. The city has developed in a near future heavily influenced by the imminent boom of the Indian subcontinent, an emerging technology and economic superpower- a hybrid culture, part Bollywood call center, part European cultural capital.  It is an imaginary landscape extrapolated from the wonders and possibilities of emerging biological and technological research.

In future Perfect project collaborations are forged between designers and technologists to develop a collection of commissioned works that can be inhabited as large scale fragments of the future city. Inhabit these moments of the from the future, sit within its pharmaceutical gardens, listen to the drone infrastructures drifting in the skies above, watch as the city endlessly remakes itself. These strategies bring the architect closer to the technologies that are increasingly shaping the urban realm and the public closer to the scientific research that is changing their world. The Future Perfect think tank includes Bruce Sterling, Warren Ellis, Rachel Armstrong, Daniel Dociu, Paul Duffield, ARC magazine, Centre For Science and Imagination, BLDGBLOG and many more. Artists and designers for Future Perfect will be announced shortly.

We are also accepting applications to be included in the other associated exhibitions of the 2013 Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Close, Closer. You can propose ideas for Crisis Buster Grants, Associated Projects, Student Prizes and a young architect Début Award - all details in the PDF attached! Check out our website for more details or download our launch booklet. You or your company can also be part of our project by becoming a friend, patron or benefactor. We are a non-profit organisation and hugely appreciate all and any support you may be able to give

exhibition


Liam Young, 13 09 11


Liam Young is part of the Glitch Fiction exhibition for the inaugural Paris Design week. The exhibition is open daily from 11:00 – 19:00 12 – 18th Sept at Cite de la Mode et du Design, Docks en Seine, Qai de Austerlitz, Pars 13. If you can’t make it to Paris then you can download the Glitch-Fiction Newspaper to see a summary of the projects.

“Glitch Fiction is the false error, the point of chute, the wormhole in the timeline, the what could have been? At the edge between science fiction and reality, a series of thought-provoking, participative and speculative design projects will be revealed.

From 12th to 18th September, Glitch Fiction will land in Paris for the very first Paris Design Week. Visit us at la Cité de la Mode et du Design to witness a chaotic Black Swan unfold, to feel the spitting heat of ash hit your high-heels in your living room, to have a machine generate your fairytales, to get caught in a thunderstorm of fish, to see your eyes, lips and skin lost in the fragments of others, to explore a new techno-social landscape through your ears or to imagine scientific rituals not yet explored.

Come, test out and experience the fringe of design for yourself. Glitch Fiction mixes activist and experimental designs in a real office of wonders. Dreams, nightmares, near realities and hyper fantasies meet in the middle to explore the implications of current and emerging technologies through the presentation of fictional scenarios, parallel worlds, extrapolated tangents, cautionary tales and design fictions. Inspired by science and technology the following proposals use design as a medium to speculate, be critical and stimulate debate around our human relationship to science and technology in our current, alternative and imagined future everyday lives.

Also in the exhibition is Gunnar Green,  Bernd Hopfengaertner, Studio Good one, Xavier Poultney , Austin Houldsworth, David Benqué, Nicolas Myers, Nitipak Samsen, Ilona Gaynor, Zoe Papadopoulou, Nelly Ben Hayoun and Good Wives and Warriors

An exhibition coordinated and managed by Nelly Ben Hayoun Studio, Visual Design and website by Nicolas Myers and David Benque

exhibition


Darryl Chen, 03 04 10


Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today is part of Superfront gallery’s group show “Unplanned”. If you can’t make it to LA, the catalogue can be ordered online, which also features essays by Geoff Manaugh (BldgBlog), David Turnbull (GSAPP), MitchMcEwen (Superfront), Ines Moreira (Petit Cabanon) and Cristina Goberna Pesudo (Fake Industries Architectural Agonism). Writes Pesudo: “…it is in the lack of consensus where this exhibition succeeds the most, where perverse imaginaries create a field for disensus apart from institutionalized points of view…” (more…)