biotechnology


Liam Young, 23 01 14


On the 23rd of january, enroute back from asia after the latest Unknown Fields expedition Liam Young will be stopping of in Rotterdam to present at How Do You Do Biodesign. Het Nieuwe Instituut and the Willem de Kooning Academy invite you to attend How Do You Do Biodesign, an evening for architects, urban designers, product designers, biologists, fashion designers, artists and digital makers and others who are curious what exactly biodesign can mean for the field of work and research. Have you ever wondered what biodesign could mean for your immediate surroundings? Are you curious to find out what biohacking is? Or do you want to learn how to design with living material? In short, do you want to know how to put biodesign into practice? How Do You Do is a format for exchanging and sharing ideas, expertise and experience. Don’t expect any fancy PowerPoint presentations. Instead, you’ll hear honest stories about the making of, with lots of information about what works and what doesn’t.
[image credit- Half life lamp by Joris Laarman]

Keep reading for the full list of speakers  (more…)

biotechnology


Liam Young, 08 08 12


The first glimpses of our new project Under Tomorrows Sky can be seen at 8pm on August 10th at MU in Eindhoven. On show will be a room sized movie miniature model of our imaginary city and behind the scenes work from the think tank.

Under Tomorrows Sky is a fictional, future city. Speculative architect Liam Young of the London based Tomorrows Thoughts Today has assembled a think tank of scientists, technologists, futurists, illustrators, science fiction authors and special effects artists to collectively develop this imaginary place, the landscapes that surround it and the stories it contains.

In online and live discussions held during the past months the think tank came together to design this future city and discuss the possibilities of emerging biologies and technologies. This time there are no dystopian visions of the future, we’ve seen enough of those. Under Tomorrows Sky imagines a post-capitalist urbanity full of optimism and joy, full of life and aspiration.

It is a city of extraordinary technology but at first glance appears indistinguishable from nature. It is an artificial reef that grows and decays and grows again as the city becomes a cyclic ecosystem. A city as a geological formation of caves and grottos covered by a thick layer of soil and slime, a biological soup of human and non-human inhabitants. The city and us are one, a symbiotic life form. The city grows and we grow with it. Together we form a giant complex organism of which ecology and technology are inseparable parts.

At this moment the phase of creation has begun. An intricately detailed miniature model of this future city will rise under tomorrows sky and come into being at MU in the upcoming weeks. Between August 10 and October 28 all involved with the creation of the model will develop a collection of fictions based in the city. The model will be the backdrop for animated films and a stage set for a collection of stories and illustrations. The audience will also be invited to contribute their own narratives to the city through a series of workshops. Under Tomorrows Sky will be the starting point of a new ecological urban vision. The city of the future is not of a fixed time or place but it will emerge through the help of many.

Opening on Friday August 10 from 8 pm onwards.
On view till October 28.

For more information and special program check the websites www.mu.nl and www.undertomorrowssky.com

image credit-Under Tomorrows Sky Concept Art by Factory Fifteen

biotechnology


Liam Young, 26 04 12


Singing Sentinels, a new exhibition from Liam Young of  Tomorrows Thoughts Today will be opening at Mediamatic Gallery in Amsterdam from 26th April.

Coal miners once hammered rock with twittering canaries living beside them, their changing song a warning alarm for a dangerous gas leak. These living sensors watched over us and kept us safe. For the fifth New Order show, London-based architect Liam Young explores a future scenario where bio-engineered birds once again monitor the air for us. 80 live birds will be introduced into the gallery as an ecological warning system, living in the space and providing audible feedback on the state of the atmosphere. Across the course of the exhibition pollution DJs will alter the air of the gallery in line with the predicted atmospheric composition of the post-carbon world. You will experience an accelerated atmospheric change and listen to the canary song subtly shift, as they sing an elegy for a changing planet. You can watch a film of one of the performances here.

Come and wander the augmented aviary of new order. With binoculars and your Birdwatchers Guidebook to Toxicity Sentinels you will be able to spot these specimens of unnatural history. Spy, high up on the rafters the green throated coal gull, bioengineered to be sensitive to increased levels of CO2. Track the infrared canaries of the Amsterdam Archaeology Institute as they scan the ground for the echoes of lost cities, see the luminescent plumage of the Roseshift Canaries as they fan their tails and sing sharply in the presence of dangerous Nitrous Oxide. Sit in the engineered ecology, watch the birds fly past and listen to their live song, a requiem for the new world order.

As a spinoff from the exhibition a new book “The Field Guide to the Singing Sentinels: A Birdwatcher’s Companion” is now availible. Co written by Liam Young, Geoff Manuagh and Tim Maly and with illustrations by comic artist Paul Duffield the field guide is a catalogue of these specimens of unnatural history including descriptions, behaviours and helpful tips for future sightings. You can see an excerpt and purchase your copy of the limited edition book online here.

[Illustration of the Red Radar by Paul Duffield]

biotechnology


Liam Young, 13 09 11


Liam Young, of Tomorrows Thoughts Today, will be giving a lecture at the MU gallery in Eindhoven to accompany our Circus Babylon exhibition curated by Lukas Feireiss. Entrance is free and the event will kick off at 8:00pm 15th September in the gallery space. Details are here. Liam will also be on hand earlier in the afternoon to talk through the Landscapes of Unnatural History installation (see fast thoughts). The event will be titled ‘A field Guide to the Landscapes of technology’ and will be a virtual walking tour through a stranger than truth history of Nature, touring roman mythology, medieval bestiaries, zoological hoaxes, travelling menageries, imaginary plants, Galapagonian invasive species, Australian supermines, japanese anime and fictional biotechnological mutants.

image credit- Nausicaa dir. Hayao Miyazaki

biotechnology


Liam Young, 04 05 11


The smaller travelling version of ‘The Imaginarium: A Theatre For Constructed Ecologies’ has been reviewed by Arbitare Magazine. You can see the full exhibition from its Berlin opening in the Fast thoughts column. The Imaginarium is co-curated by Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today and Studio Lukas Feireiss with design by Luis Berrios-Negron.  The exhibition brings together a group of architects, artists and scientists including TTT’s Liam Young, Francois Roche/R&Sie(n), Greg Lynn, Philip Beesley, Rachel Armstrong, Theo Jansen, Terunobu Fujimori, Triptyque ArchitectureIlkka Halso, Lucy McRae, Cero9Mas Yendo, and many more to engage the prescient subject of ecological change and adaptations caused by artificial interventions into existing ecosystems.

The Imaginarium is curated as an unnatural history museum of archaeological fragments, botanical samples, exhibits, evidence and curiosities. Archived in the accompanying Catalogue of Speculative Specimens we see a jump in the fossil record, an evolutionary leap, as the interbreeding of biology and technology has given birth to a strange new nature.

biotechnology


Liam Young, 03 05 11


Liam Young of TTT has a new project apprearing in the landscapes journal KERB issue 19 Paradigms of Nature: Post Natural Futures published by RMIT in Melbourne, Australia. Other contributors include TTT pals R&Sie, Dr. Rachel Armstrong, Daisy Ginsberg and Sacha Pohflepp, David Gissen et al. Have a look through the full list of contributors here. It should be an interesting issue. Go buy one.