critique


Darryl Chen, 11 06 13


Darryl Chen will be joining the final Failed Architecture event of the season. Also on the panel will be Ole Bouman, Matthias Bottger, Arjen Oosterman and Mark Studholme moving beyond ruin porn and blind futurism to discuss the benefits of failure.

Date: Thursday, June 13, 2013
Time: 20:00 – 23:00 (19:00 doors open)
Location: TrouwAmsterdam
Address: Wibautstraat 127, Amsterdam (more…)

critique


Liam Young, 17 03 13


For the March 2013 issue of the Architectural Review Liam Young has written a review of ScanLab’s ‘Frozen Relics’ exhibition in London. On display is a laser scan of Arne’s Floe, an iceberg that once existed at 17:01:07hrs on the 16 September at 79 22.558 N, 003 04.611 W on the Arctic Ocean. It has since been torn apart by undersea currents and dissolved by a warming climate but in a time when everything is digitized nothing really has to disappear. An excerpt follows but you can see the full article behind a paywall here.

Frozen Relics is an exhibition full of artifacts like this that no longer exist. They are drifting across a data landscape in which we can still see every minute crack, every ragged edge, every blemish and fissure. They are high resolution laser scans generated on site in the Fram Strait northwest of Svalbard by ScanLAB, Greenpeace and the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at Cambridge University. The memories of these seasonal islands have been frozen in a ghostly coordinate cloud of XYZ and RGB values.

We are presented with the possibilities of an extraordinarily accurate digital doppelganger, a 1:1 avatar of our world, A curated collection of replica landscapes wrought from the tool paths of herds of CNC machines, 3d printed layer by layer, a carved duplicate at extreme resolution, a theme park of synthetic copies, and like plastic tits on an ageing celebrity, timeless, as everything around them continues to decay.

Our digital lives are accumulating in endless fields of super cooled server farms, containing tweets, check ins, instagrams, porn banks, pokes and now a menagerie of floating ice bergs. In sprawling warehouses browser searches sit beside glaciers, emails beside Mayan temples. Server Farms are something between filing cabinets and cathedrals. If they are the new repositories of all knowledge and ephemera then how is the data stored, how do we access it, and is anything ever forgotten. Can some data be designed to decay, could pixels erode with time, like a portrait of Dorian Gray, slowly ageing with our sins?

What we choose to remember, what we chose to keep, defines who we are. The permanence of a point cloud iceberg, drifting endlessly in a digital sea, is an eternal reminder of how much we have to loose.

critique


Liam Young, 17 10 12


Liam Young of Tomorrows Thoughts Today will be speaking at Design Debates: How Much Design can we Digest for Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven, NL on Thursday 25th October. Also speaking will be Tracy Metz, William Myers of MOMA, and David Heltz of Connecting the Dots magazine.

Sustainability, an emerging energy crisis or a better-distributed economy: wicked problems, which do not have a one-answer solution. How can designers contribute? During the Dutch Design Week designers not only present aesthetically appealing, functional or innovative products, but also products for the mind, systems for social innovations and cross disciplinary projects that involve biology or physics. This explorative approach isn’t always easy to digest.

critique


Darryl Chen, 26 08 12


Darryl Chen, of Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today, in association with Hawkins\Brown, will unveil the New [Socialist] Village project to the public when the Venice Architecture Biennale opens its doors to the public on wednesday 29 September. Darryl was selected with 9 others to present ‘new ideas to change British Architecture’ for the British Pavilion, curated by Vicky Richardson and Vanessa Norwood.

Here’s a sneak peek of the two pieces to be exhibited: a 5-metre long scroll, taking inspiration from a renowned Song Dynasty masterpiece; and a mass-produced propaganda book. If you’re going to be in Venice, come down to the pavilion to collect your copy!

Darryl’s Venice tweet feed @darrylchen.

critique


Darryl Chen, 26 09 11


The GO11 Award for Alternate Use has announced its shortlist. TTT as Exchange Radical Moments! festival associated partners invite you to vote for your favourite entry. There are less than two months to go before the simultaneous festival on the auspicious date of 11.11.11. Log your deets here to keep informed of the upcoming programme.

critique


Darryl Chen, 08 10 09


Darryl Chen and Liam Young will be moderating a panel session at this year’s upcoming Festival of Urbanism, organized by the crew at This Is Not A Gateway. TTT will be joined by a cast of emerging and seasoned urbanists to discuss Productive Dystopia, or An Architecture of Unintended Consequences. Also on the panel will be Austin Williams (Future Cities Project); Karl Sharro (ManTowNHuman); Tomas Klassnik (Klassnik Corporation); Elena Pascolo and Alex Warnock-Smith (Urban Projects Bureau, Architectural Association); Finn Williams (Common Office); and Amin Taha (Amin Taha Architects). The night promises to be a lively one as we consider alternate ways of conceiving of the urban project beyond the blindly optimistic and optimistically futile. Spaces are free but with limited places on the night. 19.30 Friday Oct 23 Hanbury Hall, Spitalfields E1 6QR.

TINAG creates platforms for emerging academics, activists, human rights canvassers, artists, youth workers, filmmakers, architects, students and more, whose point of departure is the city.

critique


Darryl Chen, 01 12 08


 

Reinier de Graaf presented OMA’s Ras-Al-Khaimah project to a packed audience last thursday for the Architecture Foundation in London. After a characteristically thrilling account of global urban affairs effectively narrated by statistic and graph, the talk turned to the patronisingly-titled “city in the desert” project (as though we could describe London as a “city by the river”), bringing on what could be described as one of those “Elvis has left the building” moments.

OMA’s reading of Dubai as a study in banality has its response in the banal urban proposition for RAK, though in this case, banality is not the insistent cultural phenomenon of Dubai’s skyline, but rather the unashamed rolling out of the urbanist’s stock-in-trade – “compact city” densities, a public transport loop, and (yawn) the accommodation of a naturally occurring oasis. The mediocrity of this proposition is nowhere near recovered by its context-less square plan and generic city grid, tired emblems of what may be late-OMA mannerism. This is a scheme so mediocre it begs the question – what happened to one of the most intellectually engaging self-critical practices on the planet?  (more…)