tourism


Darryl Chen, 13 03 12


Darryl Chen of Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today has been selected to exhibit at the British Pavilion at this year’s Venice Architecture Biennale. Darryl will be part of the Venice Takeway global research project, and will be travelling to China in order to speculate on the future of British architecture. More details to be posted here soon.

tourism


Liam Young, 04 03 09


An Exhibition of the work of Intermediate Studio 7 run by Tomorrows Thoughts Today’s Liam Young and Kate Davies from Liquid Factory will be opening Friday 26th February in the Architectural Association’s Back members room. The exhibition titled ‘Where the Wild Things Are…’ will run until the 27th March. Update: Exhibition photos have been added below. (more…)

tourism


Darryl Chen, 14 10 08


Five hours from Tokyo and a half hour boat ride across the Setonaikai, one finds Naoshima. This island retreat once was a fishing village, but is now an art-themed Elysium inhabited by sculpture parks, two spectacular Ando museums, and a fishing village exquisitely retrofitted with site-specific artwork. Even the ferry terminal is a Sanaa bespoke. (more…)

tourism


Darryl Chen, 09 10 08


On a street of love hotels in Osaka, the Don Quijote building presents the idea of ‘facade as amusement park ride’, in so doing, referencing the room compartments of capsule hotels and indeed the capsulized love within pay-per-hour hotels. (more…)

tourism


Liam Young, 20 08 08


"The 21 Steps" by Charles Cumming screenshot

It begins suggestively “I was the wrong man, in the wrong place, at the wrong time.” This is the opening to “The 21 Steps” by Charles Cumming. It is the first of six stories written in answer to the Penguin challenge to reinvent fiction through the medium of the internet. This narrative unfolds across the birdseye London of Google Maps. Click after click you follow the story from the air, familiar places of the city, overwritten with the invisible trials of our intrepid protagonists. Here Google Maps is not just a tool of location and navigation but an excursion into daydream and fantasy. read it here

phantom bird nests

I am reminded of my recent trip to Beijing where I played architectural tourist, scouting out a preview of the Olympic icons guided by my Google Map print outs. Just like our ’21 steps’ hero I was consistently the wrong man in the wrong place, this time however it was the misinformation of my Google guide that led me astray. I had to track down each building from somewhere within a point cloud of misguided user added Google markers. Like a roadtrip couple bickering over who gets to use the map, it seems the collective intellegence of the web is yet to reach a sightseeing consensus.  I was walking a fictional Beijing, filled with eight imaginary Bird Nests, a new reading of place built from the mistakes of hundreds of Google literate, lost tourists.

So here we are, iphone at the ready, Google Maps in hand, embarking on journeys of strangeness and novelty as our cities are imbued with the traces of invisible maps of fantasy, mistakes, and misdirection, all uploaded by the connected population of the world/web 2.0.

tourism


Darryl Chen, 29 07 08


 

Who ever thought that travelling from one side of the Huangpu River to the other could be such a mind-altering experience? After descending from the regal Bund district into a collecting tunnel, uniformed attendees usher you into a sanitized antechamber, receiving room for the automated people-movers small standing height vehicles taking the form of white bubbles, exhibiting a smoothness of design not out of place in Kubrick’s A Space Odyssey. Eerie muzak dominates over the electrical silence of the vehicles adding to the cinematic nature of the experience. Pass the duchie and read on.   

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